"Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

reminisce about bbc micro & electron games like chuckie egg, repton, elite & exile

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Vroomfondel
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"Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby Vroomfondel » Mon May 09, 2016 3:26 am

In school around 1985 the class had a game that ran for a few weeks. We were in teams of 4 or so and each of us was a character in the game. You were stranded on an Island and had to explore the island moving N/S/E/W etc and generally figure out how to escape. Periodically one of you would get bitten by a cobra or you'd find food that kind of thing.

The game was on a BBC Micro I think. Not sure specifically but I think all the computers in schools were those at the time. I was utterly obsessed with this game! I've looked for it many times and I can't even find a mention of it and boy I've looked and looked and looked. I'd really love to find it. It would bring back some seriously old memories!

Pretty certain it was called "Adventure Island". Someone from my school mentioned it and confirmed the name on FaceBook a while back. Can anyone remember this at all???

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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby Ottly » Mon May 09, 2016 5:32 am

Sounds like "Raft away river". Don't know adventure island though sorry.

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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby Dethmunk » Tue Jul 05, 2016 12:35 pm

Are you sure it was called Adventure Island? ... there was an adventure game called Savage Island. I think it was in 2 parts too.
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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby hoglet » Tue Jul 05, 2016 2:43 pm

Was it "Island Adventure"?

Try is here:
http://bbcmicro.co.uk/jsbeeb/?autoboot& ... enture.ssd

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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby joachim » Mon Sep 05, 2016 8:35 pm

Not very much help, but this thesis refers several times to a BBC educational title called "Adventure Island":

http://e.bangor.ac.uk/3913/6/DX086089_1.pdf
http://e.bangor.ac.uk/3913/2/DX086089_2.pdf

and a person in this thread claims that Adventure Island (the BBC educational title) was by 4Mation (which would explain why it's disappeared, since their copyrights are still being enforced AFAIK):

https://forums.penny-arcade.com/discuss ... -that-game

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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby lurkio » Mon Sep 05, 2016 9:56 pm

Well, this thesis says that Adventure Island was published by "GINN MATHS [in] 1986". (What is it with Adventure Island and theses..?)


And this Acorn User review confirms the "Ginn" part but says the company/publisher was actually "Ginn & Co.":


Actually, that Acorn User piece was quite a rave review:

In the July 1989 issue of Acorn User, Dave Futcher wrote:Probably the most well known island simulation is Adventure Island published by Ginn nearly five years ago. It is a ‘classroom classic’ and still available and worth buying. It can and is very often played by individuals but it was really designed for groups of children using their skills collaboratively.

The scenario is that the children have been stranded on a tropical island. They are required to make decisions and overcome difficulties and dangers in an attempt to survive the rigours of the fictitious island by exploring the various features in an attempt to ultimately escape or get rescued.

To start off the simulation, children write a short story describing the events that led to them being marooned on the island. Then with the program loaded for the first time they must choose five items of equipment to aid their survival from a limited list - first aid kit, nylon cord, knife, mirror, box of matches, magnifying glass, shovel, axe, five litre water container and magnetic compass.

Each group using the simulation then starts from a pre-determined position and they begin their exploration of the island using the separate large scale map as reference to their position given on the screen and their guide to the features of the island.

The challenge of survival is made more demanding by random occurrences of hazards which may affect weather and/or health conditions and may necessitate quick reorganisation of strategy.

Further interest is added by the map showing a number of unusual features and the tempting possibility of discovering long lost treasure.

Adventure Island is designed to be used as an extended activity made up of a series of sessions at the keyboard. Each one of which is meant to represent ‘a day’ on the island. An integral part of the project is keeping a daily diary of the group’s experiences.

As well as this, the children also have to ‘research’ the various finds they make in their travels. For instance what are taro roots and are they any use to them? The children may also have to decide, if they have taken a first aid kit, which medicine they need to administer should one of the group suffer from ailments such as heat exhaustion.

As the scenario unravels, the children can document their adventure with a mixture of factual and creative writing plus some art and craft work.

As the children progress around the island a variety of problems have to be solved. For example they may need to decipher a mathematical sequence or a morse code message.

There are many dangers and dilemmas to be faced. There are swamps and minefields to be negotiated and events like an attack by a wild boar on groups at particular places.

When this does occur, usually one member of a group gets injured. As ever, at least one of the children in the group will be intent on travelling on to the cave where they had planned to shelter for the night whatever the cost. But with the injured person in no state to travel and the map being consulted and some realization that the planned overnight halt was up a steep incline, it all might seem an unnecessary risk.

The only answer is for them to seek shelter immediately so the injured person can recover by morning.

The diary entries for such days, are full of vivid description of the attack of the wild boars and a report of the decisions that led to the change of plans.

Using a simulation such as Adventure Island is not just about pressing buttons. It is about discussion, considering options and making decisions.

The bulk of the work when using this kind of simulation is done away from the computer. Learning is not derived from merely responding to the computer’s display but is the interaction of the group, the research and the joy of discovering things around the island.

The latest package from Cambridgeshire Software is Rescue: An Island Adventure . This has been developed with a lot of input from Ian Whittington who was behind the original Adventure Island.

Rescue certainly shows how programming techniques have moved on from the basic text displays of Adventure Island. Here the whole simulation takes place in an animated microworld.

Unlike Adventure Island the scenario is set ...


Sounds good!

:idea:
Last edited by lurkio on Tue Sep 20, 2016 7:56 am, edited 3 times in total.

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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby leenew » Mon Sep 05, 2016 10:04 pm

It's in box 157 at CCH

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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby lurkio » Mon Sep 05, 2016 10:27 pm

leenew wrote:It's in box 157 at CCH

You might be confusing Adventure Island with Rescue: An Island Adventure. (The latter happens to have been written "with a lot of input" from the creator of the former, according to the article I quoted above!)

Adventure Island is text only.

Rescue: An Island Adventure is graphical, I believe.

(More details here: https://archive.org/stream/AcornUser084-Jul89#page/n125/mode/1up/search/ginn)

Vroomfondel, could you please clarify which of these two games you're looking for (if indeed it is one of these and not something else entirely!)?

:?:

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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby vanpeebles » Tue Sep 06, 2016 9:14 am

I vaguely remember one from school where it had a river down the middle of the screen and I think you had to build a raft to cross the river before it floods? Does anyone remember this one? I think it had resource things too.

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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby lurkio » Tue Sep 06, 2016 9:57 am

vanpeebles wrote:I vaguely remember one from school where it had a river down the middle of the screen and I think you had to build a raft to cross the river before it floods? Does anyone remember this one? I think it had resource things too.

Okay, so I've never seen it, but that does sound like Raft Away River, which Ottly mentioned above.

:idea:

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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby vanpeebles » Tue Sep 06, 2016 2:28 pm

It could have been that but I don't remember it looking as fancy as that. I'm sure it had a rain effect that was slash / across the whole screen. I think it would of been around the same time as Podd etc. I'll have to check that one out though!

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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby lurkio » Tue Sep 06, 2016 3:13 pm

In the July 1989 issue of Acorn User, Dave Futcher wrote:Probably the most well known island simulation is Adventure Island published by Ginn ... It is a ‘classroom classic’ and still available and worth buying. It can and is very often played by individuals but it was really designed for groups of children using their skills collaboratively.

Okay, so it's looking like the educational Beeb game Adventure Island published by Ginn & Co. (previously) might actually have been a fairly big deal.

Not only does it seem to have featured in several academic papers, but there was also a film made about it!

Here's a synopsis of the Adventure Island film from the BFI website:

The BFI wrote:A demonstration and exposition of the philosophy behind the adventure project devised by Ian Whittington and Barry Holmes to integrate a computer with traditional discovery-method materials in the classroom. Shows Ian Whittington working with his class of 9-11 year olds both with the computer which sets the problems and on the associated discovery work necessary to solve them. Recorded at Great Gidding Primary School, Cambridgeshire


The creators of Adventure Island were Barry Holmes and Ian Whittington. Whittington worked at Great Gidding Primary School in Cambridgeshire, where he was (or would become) headmaster -- as well as being the resident computer programmer, apparently. Well, I'm not sure he did the actual programming himself, but he does seem to have been instrumental in the design and testing of the software.

Whittington was also co-creator of Cars: Maths In Motion (published by Cambridgeshire Software House, who also published the spiritual successor to Adventure Island, namely Rescue: An Island Adventure, which was developed under Whittington's guidance).

    Cars: Maths In Motion: Info

Cars: Maths In Motion was another educational title for the Beeb, which somehow grew and grew, and today it's the basis of an annual global maths competition for schools around the world. It's been sponsored by Jaguar and rebranded as the Jaguar Maths In Motion Challenge. (From little Acorns...)

Yet another of Whittington's creations was the Egyptological archaeology game Expedition To Saqqara. Here are some details about Expedition To Saqqara from -- you guessed it -- an academic paper that features Whittington:

In the journal Teaching History, Ron Jones wrote:The third and final example of the trend in the use of microcomputers in Primary Schools is drawn directly from history. It uses history as the vehicle for the practice of many of life's skills and yet at the same time succeeds in teaching children something of Ancient Egypt. The program, devised by Ian Whittington, headmaster of Great Gidding School in Cambridgeshire is called SAQQARA. Its database is built upon the actual data found at the famous archaeological site and has been verified by experts at the Department of Egyptology in the British Museum. In fact, the whole project has led to the village children becoming so involved in the subject that the experts have invited them down to the specialist museum -- what a spin-off!

The program challenges the children to write letters to the Department of Antiquities in Cairo to seek a licence to dig in a certain area of the desert where it is thought there exists certain ancient sites. The licence eventually arrives, and then they are presented with the problem of raising sufficient funds to mount the expedition. They write away to various Universities and are eventually successful. They reach the site, hire their workers and begin the survey. They are given the choice of a surface survey, or a dig -- which goes down to six levels! They keep a very careful log, on graph paper, of every single find at all levels. They are also encouraged to keep a daily log/diary and it is from reading these diaries that one sees the total involvement of the children in the project and how easily they are using the computer as their link with the past.

When they discover relics (which are in the positions actually discovered at the real site), they then look up diagrams, inscriptions etc. of the various finds. The "discoveries" made by the groups of children are completely random as they would be in the actual dig. They collate their finds on a giant wall plan so that each group can follow the whole expedition. To see the results of this approach to history is quite exciting and again opens the mind to the enormous potential of this sophisticated tool which is now so readily available to teachers for use as a powerful teaching tool.

In summary, then, Ian Whittington was apparently a pioneer in the use of computers in schools (Beebs specifically, it seems). He designed and/or wrote four Beeb games that we know of:

  • Adventure Island (Ginn & Co.): Info
  • Expedition To Saqqara (Cambridgeshire Software House): Info
  • Cars: Maths In Motion (Cambridgeshire Software House): Info
  • Rescue: An Island Adventure (Cambridgeshire Software House): Info

Do you know anything more about any of these games? If so, then please get in touch.

:?:
Last edited by lurkio on Tue Sep 20, 2016 7:46 am, edited 35 times in total.

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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby leenew » Tue Sep 06, 2016 4:59 pm

Outstanding research Mr. L. =D>

Lee.

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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby flaxcottage » Thu Sep 08, 2016 8:43 pm

Post edited by admin:

Cars ... and Rescue ... is found.

Admin: Unfortunately CSH still wish to enforce copyright, so please don't post any of their titles on the forum.
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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby Arcadian » Thu Sep 08, 2016 8:53 pm

Ah, was going to say - I have Cars: Maths in Motion and it should have been one of the ones I'd recently loaned to flaxcottage - hence I'd have been surprised if he didn't have it!
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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby lurkio » Fri Sep 09, 2016 11:19 pm

Moo.

:-#
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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby lurkio » Wed Sep 14, 2016 6:34 pm

More research on the elusive missing games Adventure Island and Expedition To Saqqara.

Here's a fairly detailed, illustrated article about Adventure Island, Expedition To Saqqara and other Ginn games, from the April 1984 issue of Acorn User:

    Pages from AcornUser8404No21.pdf
    Article on Adventure Island, Expedition To Saqqara, etc., from the April 1984 edition of Acorn User
    (2.84 MiB) Downloaded 34 times

One of the authors of the article is Barry Holmes, co-creator with Ian Whittington of Adventure Island.

    Untitled.jpg
    Illustration from Acorn User article on Ginn games: map of Adventure Island

And here's evidence that the games were actually sold -- to schools at least. It's an advert placed by Ginn in The International Schools Journal (1983):


That advert indicates that the games were sold as a series under the banner of Ginn Microcomputer Software. Another of the games in that series was Mary Rose.

    1.png
    Screenshot of title screen to Mary Rose, showing the Ginn logo
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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby lurkio » Sun Sep 18, 2016 6:01 pm

I'm still slowly building up my dossier on the educational Beeb game Adventure Island by Ian Whittington (Ginn & Co.), which is still missing.

Here are Chris Drage's memories of it, from the Times Educational Supplement, 1st November 2002:

Chris Drage wrote:In 1984, my class of 10-year-olds spent six weeks engaged in one of the most inspirational units of work I ever undertook with children. The study used a text-based adventure program called Adventure Island. The success of this whole cross-curricula venture was due in no small part to the fact that it was the children's own imaginations at work, not computer graphics.

Some 16 years later, Adventure Island has been revamped. Archipelago is the name of the new version ... In Archipelago, the emphasis is quite different than with Adventure Island. While the former has much to do with PSHE goals, the latter was more about delivering all parts of the curriculum via the adventure.

High praise indeed.

UPDATE: Just found some more praise for Adventure Island, again from Chris Drage:

Mr Drage said: "The best six weeks' teaching I ever did was in 1984. A class of 10 year olds with just a single BBC computer played a game called Adventure Island.

"It had no graphics, just text. The kids were in groups of four and each had 20 minutes on the island.

"We dedicated the whole classroom to it. It really inspired them.

"They had to write a fictional diary of their time on the island. It brought out the best creative writing I've seen.

"We covered science, maths, technology, history, geography, all on the back of a 20-minute computer game. It was a great example of technology, however basic, enhancing learning.
:idea:

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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby danielj » Tue Sep 20, 2016 9:25 am

Hi all,
We understand that CSH are still enforcing copyright on their titles - as such, please don't post any of them on this forum.

d.

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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby Vroomfondel » Fri Jun 02, 2017 11:30 pm

lurkio wrote:More research on the elusive missing games Adventure Island and Expedition To Saqqara.

Here's a fairly detailed, illustrated article about Adventure Island, Expedition To Saqqara and other Ginn games, from the April 1984 issue of Acorn User:

    Pages from AcornUser8404No21.pdf

One of the authors of the article is Barry Holmes, co-creator with Ian Whittington of Adventure Island.

    Untitled.jpg

And here's evidence that the games were actually sold -- to schools at least. It's an advert placed by Ginn in The International Schools Journal (1983):


That advert indicates that the games were sold as a series under the banner of Ginn Microcomputer Software. Another of the games in that series was Mary Rose.

    1.png



Sorry the very late reply. I assumed I'd get email notifications if anyone responded. Yes the game you described is exactly what I was looking for where children play in groups. This map picture certainly brings back memories. I think I even roughly remember where I died a few hours after being bitten by a cobra!! :-)

As I recall our teacher looked to thoroughly enjoy the experience as well. The class was really engaged in it and we all sat there with notebooks to keep a diary. Really good fun.

Thanks very much for the research, I'm impressed!! Shame the game isn't around but seeing the map was nice and brought back a lot of memories!!

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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby Vroomfondel » Mon Jun 05, 2017 8:39 am

lurkio wrote:Moo.

:-#


If you have any questions and PM me then bear in mind I'm apparently not able to reply as I'm a newbie!! :-) Not sure what the conditions are on being able to, I can't seem to find that on the FAQ. I might have to make a number of posts. I've notice this place covers the Acorn Atom as well which might not make that too difficult! Had one as a kid. My parents reckon it taught me to count! Anyway I digress....

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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

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Interact some more by posting, or contact an administrator and ask. Also pop over here and have a read.

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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby digitaurus » Tue Aug 15, 2017 2:11 pm

Hello. If anyone is interested in more detail on some of these titles then I am happy to help. I wrote the original software, on the BBC Micro, for Cars - Maths in Motion in early 1985 during my gap year. CSH (Cambridgeshire Software House) consisted of three of us - Brian Richardson, Tim Denyer and myself (as the jobbing programmer). We all also worked at the time for some other SMEs based in the same offices in St Ives - there isn't much money in educational software :D .

Barry Holmes (who has sadly passed away) was a family friend and Headmaster at one of the local schools. The real creative inspiration for all these titles came from Ian Whittington who taught at the tiny primary school at Great Gidding which as I recall only had two or three rooms. I visited him when he was teaching. He pioneered the group-work approach which worked so brilliantly for children and teachers and came up with the core ideas for the programs. In the case of Cars, he had developed (and programmed) a simple concept that he used with his class of children and we then developed something which actually had quite a lot more depth (and mathematics) (measuring angles, lengths, refuelling strategies etc.) I think we probably made more changes than had been the case for Saqarra, Adventure Island etc but I may be mistaken as I wasn't around for those.

Prior to 1985, CSH titles had all been marketed, published and branded by Ginn. "Cars" was the first significant product marketed directly by CSH. A previous post above has a photo of the packaging for Cars, which I will almost certainly have put together (in addition to writing the code I was responsible for copying disks, packaging up products and sending them out in the post). I went off to university in summer 1985 and it was only a few years ago that I discovered Brian turned "Cars" into a 30+ year (and running) project. He sent me a current version (for a PC) a year ago but I haven't had a chance to boot it up yet. From what I have seen, it hasn't changed much...

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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby flaxcottage » Tue Aug 15, 2017 3:50 pm

Welcome. :D

digitaurus wrote:Hello. If anyone is interested in more detail on some of these titles then I am happy to help.


Yes please. :)
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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby digitaurus » Tue Aug 15, 2017 4:28 pm

Please feel free to post messages here or PM me. I will provide any additional information I can, bearing in mind that I was involved Sep 1984 - July 1985. A quick Google search gave this link of a listing from September 1986 which is useful for titles of software around during that time period: http://chrisacorns.computinghistory.org ... ompact.pdf

As of September 1986, the following CSH titles are listed in that pdf:
Dinosaurs
Let's Explore - London
Let's Explore - Paris
Cars: Maths in Motion
Police: Language in Evidence
Infant Farmer
Archaeology
Town

Of these, I can definitively identify the first 5 products. I helped package and distribute Dinosaurs. I wrote the code for Let's Explore - London, Let's Explore - Paris and Cars: Match in Motion. Finally, Police: Language in Evidence was in concept development when I finished working and headed off to university. I don't think that Ian W was involved in that one.

I speculate that "Archaeology" might be the "Saqarra" title which I think came back from Ginn. The Ginn titles are not found in the 1986 document I am linking. I'm not sure what the fate of the commercial arrangement with Ginn was but important titles from the Ginn days were "Adventure Island", "Adventure to Saqarra" and "Raise the Mary Rose". The Saqarra and Mary Rose titles were both archaeological digs as was the (much simpler) Dinosaurs program.

Please let me know what sort of additional information you are interested in.

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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby leenew » Tue Aug 15, 2017 7:53 pm

Hi there,

What other details do you remember about the CSH games and how they worked, and also what do you remember about actually programming them? It would be really interesting material to read and have recorded before it's too late!

Any info on Adventure Island and Saqqara in particular would be good to have, but I understand they were before your time, as it were.

Thanks for your contribution, for which I'm very grateful.
Lee.
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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby flaxcottage » Tue Aug 15, 2017 8:11 pm

Thanks for the further info. :)

I own the following titles;

Adventure Island (software only)
Rescue: An Island Adventure
Cars - Maths in Motion
Expedition to Saqqara (software only)
The Mary Rose (software only)
Maths in Space (software only)
Police - Language in Evidence
Round the World (software only)

The (software only) titles are actual floppy discs sourced from various places, most from a teacher's centre in Scotland. I still have hundreds of floppies yet to investigate so there could be other titles in there.
- John

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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby danielj » Tue Aug 15, 2017 8:24 pm

I'd be absolutely fascinated to see the documentation/teachers notes that went with the Mary Rose software - I have very frustrating memories of using it in my final year in primary school, finding absolutely nothing, after a trip to Portsmouth to see the Mary Rose (this would have been 1986/7). :D

d.

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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby digitaurus » Wed Aug 23, 2017 7:34 pm

leenew wrote:Hi there,

What other details do you remember about the CSH games and how they worked, and also what do you remember about actually programming them? It would be really interesting material to read and have recorded before it's too late!

Any info on Adventure Island and Saqqara in particular would be good to have, but I understand they were before your time, as it were.

Thanks for your contribution, for which I'm very grateful.
Lee.


Sorry for delay replying. I suspect the contemporary literature that you have all mentioned on this site will give pretty good guidance of how the titles were intended to be used in the classroom - but here is my tuppence worth. I think a critical point is that at the time (early to mid 1980s) a classroom generally only had one computer in it. Also, when you are sat at a computer interacting with it you are not interacting with anyone else; computers are very isolating, both from the classmates and the teacher. CSH software (as conceived by Ian Whittington and Barry Holmes) dealt with those constraints incredibly effectively, in my opinion. For all of the titles (that I am aware of) it was intended that a class would be split into groups (say of 4 or so pupils) and for the bulk of the time would be doing some kind of investigative work together away from the computer. From time-to-time a group brings the results of their work (e.g. a decision on how to set up a racing car for a practice lap, a decision about to where to dig next) to the computer, enters the results into the simulation and receives some kind of feedback (you crashed on turn 3, you found nothing) and perhaps some kind of indication of what might be a good thing to do next. Certainly with 'Cars' (and maybe with other titles, can't remember) we also had major occasions (grand prix races) where the whole class came together and experienced a live race between the racing cars the groups had set up, executing the race instructions (engine setup, tyre types, fuel levels, refuelling strategies etc.) they had given and finding out who crashes out, who wins and so forth.

Of course the fact that most of the time the groups were away from the computer and working collaboratively to investigate a problem or solve something meant it was much easier for the teacher to keep a handle on everybody's progress and help/interact with groups. The teacher, however, was an important component in making the whole thing 'work'. It was a pretty open-ended and Socratic design. The titles (if well taught) were very effective at firing childrens' imaginations. I think they really hit the spot for their age group (primary, say the 5-10 age range) and could be used to generate enthusiasm for history, archaeology, technology, fashions (thinking Mary Rose here or even Saqarra), engineering and mathematics. 'Cars' is still being used this way very successfully across the country from what I see and provides some kind of a model for how most CSH software was intended to be used.

So the computer was used to help the children create an immersive environment in the heads - NOT on the screen. We REALLY did not go for any whizzy graphics. This was part serendipity - none of the main creatives were proper software developers and that probably goes for the programmers [certainly for me at the time :D ]). I remember Barry Holmes wanted me (in '85) to put some more graphics into 'Cars' and I declined - partly memory issues, partly my own skills, partly the title really didn't need it. I think that 'Cars' still follows pretty much the same philosophy. This whole issue of design philosophy was actively argued over at the time. I remember a BBC programme in 1985 where there was something of a row about the issue. Someone had built a [BBC Micro?] program where you could travel around / through a human body seeing how the anatomy fitted together - how the organs sat relative to one another etc. It was really cool - an anatomy / physiology lesson without the need for cadavers and it looked awesome. The designer argued in the programme that this was the future of computers in education - not stuff with rubbish animation/simulation like Granny's Garden (?) or Adventure Island or Mary Rose. It was never really an either-or thing but people got exercised about this stuff at the time.

From a programming perspective, the super cool things were (i) the ability to swap code into memory for execution during run time and (ii) (less important for us) the ability to have assembled code in-line with BBC Basic if you needed something to run fast. (i) was ideally suited to the group-investigate-then-interrogate model because you could offer a very wide range of different interrogation/interaction modules without running into memory problems. But you know more about this from looking at the code than I can remember.

Hope this is helpful.

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1024MAK
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Re: "Adventure Island" Does anyone know it??

Postby 1024MAK » Wed Aug 23, 2017 9:09 pm

Thank you =D>
It puts things into context :D

Mark
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